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was a few days before the election when the early vote numbers continued to look very, very good for us. >> you thought it long before a few days before the election. i know that. [laughter] >> but i was pretty sure. >> how long were you pretty sure? when cowed he he -- could he have turned it around? debate one? >> absolutely. it was a close election. we won by three points. it was competitive the entire way. i think governor romney could have won up until the very end. i always believed in the fundamental truth which is we were building the best grassroots campaign. we had the best candidate and the best message. i believe we were going to win. >> in a way the story of the election is the degree to which you replicated the '08 results. many people putting on the republican pollsters thought that '08 was a once-in-a-lifetime result. you came close to replicating it. i think the best stat is african-americans in ohio. 11% of the electorate in '08. 15% of the electorate. you found 200,000 more african-american voters who turned out for you. mitt romney lost the state by 103,000. that was
. with us today, jon meacham, presidential historian and author of "thomas jefferson: the art of power," michael beschloss, presidential historian, annette gordon-reed, author of "the hemingses of monticello," and jodi kantor, "new york times" writer. as president obama looks to his special terms, historians look at his past with great decisions and great achievements. the president met with several historians during his first term to get their vials. in fact, jodi kantor has written about those sessions between the president and the historians. how does history judge most presidents? george washington and f.d.r. in the top three and lincoln is number one, and fourth, thomas jefferson. i'm so impressed that you got to write the book. what gives thomas jefferson, the author of the declaration of independence, the right to be up there with the top three? del there are three things. one, he doubled the size of the country with the louisiana purchase, seizing a moment that might have slipped away. napoleon rethought this real estate deal and jefferson moved more quickly, got it done. i thi
take a live look at a cold, cold times square. it is too cold out there. with us on set, though, msnbc contributor mike barnicle. also national affairs editor for "new york" magazine and msnbc legal analyst, john heilemann. as always, tv's own willie geist. willie, your new york giants, man, they had a rough month. you know, they had a great game last night. i've got to say, though, there's a disturbing trend going on. i think -- i know how parents at the time in the 1960s when they started finding bong pipes -- >> bong pipes? did you just say bong pipes? >> in their children's rooms. so anyway, those big old -- anyway. these quarterbacks, willie -- >> pass the bong. >> and aaron rodgers, just like the fsu quarterback, just like 1,000 quarterbacks this weekend that i saw. they were all wearing these mustaches, and they're repulsive. >> i know. i know. >> they are repulsive. >> what's that about? >> they look like they're from, you know, it's like why don't you just bring the sudafed on the sidelines and a bunsen burner, you know? come on, man. >> it's -- >> what's wrong with them? >> i
." ♪ ♪ >> eric: who in the world can save us from the fiscal cliff? >> first of all, give honor to god. ♪ ♪ lord and savior, barack obama. >> eric: not even that savior. 36 days going over the fiscal cliff. you should know what is at stake if partisans don't figure out a way soon. bush tax cut goes away and that alone would drive taxup fo. the patches will die as well. so add in the failure of the super committee and sequestered $1.2 trillion. spending cuts of $600 billion in defense. why are we here? you can't blame revenues. americans forked over $2.3 trillion in taxes and fees last year. the taxaholics are stone cold drunk on our spending. spending is out of control. mr. president, waiting for you to stand up and show leadership. bob, haven't heard a thing. crickets. >> eric: i think you heard things. there is movement going on here. >> bob: i'm glad they're breaking away from norquist and say there is a need for revenue. i think whether that comes in form of limiting deductions to $50,000 for people making over $250,000 or -- >> eric: i can say. we will get to all of that. we'll get to the d
of it find out what's going on. thank you to both of you ffr joining us. we appreciate it. that is all we have for you today. we will see you tomorrow on "the willis report." ♪ [music playing] ♪ [music playing] ♪ >> hello, everybody, i am cheryl casone in for gerri willis. today's the start of the lame-duck session. president obama spoke to harry reid over the phone about the fiscal cliff over the weekend. the white house is making it clear today that the president won't sign a bill that extends tax cuts for those earning $250,000 a year in social security. it will not be part of the fiscal cliff. so we are going to talk about the compromise. we have a congress and to talk about this with us. >> and you for having me cheryl: or a little bill? >> we were waiting and hoping to compromise with its administration. but they they would just never come to the table. >> these democrats want to continue spending on social programs, republicans don't want tax cuts to be touched. you think we can have compromise from both sides on each of these issues? the rhetoric that we are
are hoping to keep the campaign going and use their new leverage at the polls to bin the fight for higher taxes against the wealthy. >>> this is "hardball," the place for politics. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> get ready for some more partisan agendas in the state governments across the country. that's because some january at least 37 states will be under single party control. 37 of them. with one party holding both houses of state legislatures and the governorship. and that's the largest number of states under single party control in 60 years. 24 of those 37 states will be controlled by republicans and 13 under democratic control. we'll be right back. johan comes in a porcelain vessel, crafted with care by a talented
will be joining us right over here. first, i want to let you people know i am a jew who is in to politics. ( cheers and applause ). been doing the show 15 years now. ( laughter ) speaking of which, ooh, i think we have a new middle east war brewing out there. that's late-breaking news. we'll have to deal with that when we get back. what's better than a middle east war. let's begin one more from the "where are they now?." you may remember mitt romney made a rather infamous statement that 47% of the country would not vote for him because they saw himself as victims, entitled-- housing, health care, from the government. as it turns out, much to his disappointment, barack obama was able to pick up four more percent of real america giving him the victory. of course romney walked back his 47% statement. >> in this case i said something that was just completely wrong, and i absolutely believe, however, that my life has shown that i care about 100%, and-- and that's been demonstrated throughout my life. >> jon: i believe him. ( laughter ) there's something about a man standing in front of a pe
like plato or karl-marx-stadt says that is not the case. tell us how they lock horns. >> it has to be one of the oldest debates with social science predating the idea there is but the hideous social forces explain human outcomes. . . >> it's all about biography. what i thought is these are two further apart view points. the problem is that both arguments make sense. the social scientists or the people following the tradition of, you know, not just marx, but most social scientists say, look, there's three reasons why leaders don't matter that much, that the leader of my organization faces external constraints. if you're the ceo of company, you have competitors. you can't set prices at whatever you want. there's internal constraints, tradition, culture, everything inside a country, company, military unit. you can't do whatever you want. most importantly, leaders are not chosen randomly so most leaders of powerful organizations, organizations that we care about, organizations that have the ability to reshape history, they are not picked out of a hat, but picked because that organiz
and hamas. >>> new egyptian leader, same old story for the u.s. relationship? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 26, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. welcome back from the long break. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. congressional leaders return to washington this week and with just 36 days left to avert the so-called fiscal cliff becoming more apparent that senate republicans want a deal and they would like one pretty quick. but while there may be a bi-p t bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxes ride. chambliss spoke to his hometown station. >> that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9